Breast Cancer Survivor Shares Her Clinical Trial Story

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Clinical trials may help some women with breast cancer.

Conducting breast cancer research is an ongoing process. Scientists all around the world are conducting studies to try and learn more about the disease. To understand if new pharmaceuticals work, people need to take the medicine and undergo examination in clinical trials. Eliana Bahamon was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 36, and with the suggestion of her employer, she was connected with the medical team at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, according to Healthline.

Bahamon had triple negative cancer, a rare form of the disease. Doctors informed her that she was a candidate for a neoadjuvant therapy trial, which is given before the patient receives treatment. The procedure uses medicine to kill cancer cells, according to the National Cancer Institute. Bahamon also underwent a lumpectomy and radiation.

After being told she was in remission, Bahamon joined a second clinical trial that tests medicine aimed at preventing a recurrence.

“I don’t ever think women can be too informed about participating in clinical trials.” Dr. Kerin Adelson of Dubin Breast Center told Healthline. “Because so many women over the last 30 years have participated in crucial clinical trials, the survival rates for breast cancer have significantly improved.”

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