Study Finds That Even Light Drinking Could Increase Your Risk of Breast Cancer

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We’ve long known that there’s a connection between alcohol consumption and cancer. Alcohol has been a known carcinogen since 1987 and was recognized as a potential cause of breast cancer in 2007. But how much is too much? Can you have a drink a day without increasing your risk? Can even light drinking impact your chances?

A new study in “Research Society on Alcoholism” is shedding some light on this matter.

Before, researchers thought it might take as many as three drinks per day to increase the risk of breast cancer. However, the findings of this study suggest it doesn’t take nearly that much.

In 2012, about 144,000 breast cancer cases and 38,000 breast cancer deaths could be attributed to alcohol consumption. 18.8% of cases and 17.5% of deaths were women who were only light drinkers.

Some researchers are changing their suggestion about how often alcohol should be consumed to help cut the chances of developing breast cancer and other diseases, as the stomach and esophagus are also adversely affected by alcohol.

So what does “light drinking” mean in terms of alcohol consumption? Watch the video to find out!

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Elizabeth Nelson is a wordsmith, an alumna of Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, a four-leaf-clover finder, and a grammar connoisseur. She has lived in west Michigan since age four but loves to travel to new (and old) places. In her free time, she. . . wait, what’s free time?