This Daily Practice Can Reduce Doctor Visits by Almost Half

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A Massachusetts General Hospital-based study, affiliated with Harvard, recently showed that relaxation is good for your health! The results revealed that individuals who participated in the Relaxation Response Resiliency Program — a mind-body training that includes deep breathing, meditation, and prayer — may exhibit better overall health, and were 43% less likely to utilize health care services.

Meditation

While these activities have been known to reduce stress for quite some time, the physiological effects were less well known, and could prove to be tremendously beneficial during a time of strained healthcare resources at little monetary cost to practitioners, and with relatively no risk. Intended to help with headaches, high blood pressure, and anxiety, the Relaxation Response technique also allows individuals to feel more in control of their daily lives, and could be a great measure in preventative healthcare. By utilizing these simple techniques, practitioners could get a leg up on disease management and prevention. With stress-related disorders ranking third (after heart disease and cancer) in the US’s annual health care expenditures — this could be important news!

Yoga

Interested in starting your day off with relaxation exercises? Feeling a little nervous about getting started? Take a look at these 6 tips for mediation! Looking to learn a relaxation technique that will also get your heart pumping? Check out these 6 different yoga styles, and see if there’s one that’s right for you!

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Lindsy and her ten-year-old lab, Eleanor Rigby Fitzgerald, moved to Seattle two years ago from Tucson, Arizona. They chose Seattle because they heard that's where they kept all the good coffee - plus Ella learned about grass. L. De Mello likes books, music, movies, running, and being outdoors as much as possible.